Month: August 2013

Coherent dynamical recoupling of diffusion-driven decoherence in magnetic resonance | Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 080404 (2013)

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Coherent dynamical recoupling of diffusion-driven decoherence in magnetic resonance

Gonzalo A. Álvarez, Noam Shemesh, and Lucio Frydman
Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100, Israel
Received 13 May 2013; published 20 August 2013

During recent years, dynamical decoupling (DD) has gained relevance as a tool for manipulating and interrogating quantum systems. This is particularly relevant for spins involved in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), where DD sequences can be used to prolong quantum coherences, or to selectively couple or decouple the effects imposed by random environmental fluctuations. In this Letter, we show that these concepts can be exploited to selectively recouple diffusion processes in restricted spaces. The ensuing method provides a novel tool to measure restriction lengths in confined systems such as capillaries, pores or cells. The principles of this method for selectively recoupling diffusion-driven decoherence, its standing within the context of diffusion NMR, extensions to the characterization of other kinds of quantum fluctuations, and corroborating experiments, are presented.

© 2013 American Physical Society

via Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 080404 (2013): Coherent Dynamical Recoupling of Diffusion-Driven Decoherence in Magnetic Resonance.

arXiv: [1305.2794] Coherent dynamical recoupling of diffusion-driven decoherence in magnetic resonance.

Time evolution of the spin magnetization under CPMG (N = 8 pulses) and Hahn-echo sequences for spins diffusing in a restricted space (circles, triangles), and under free diffusion (crosses, dashes). The solid black lines show the time range where the restricted diffusion effects dominate; the difference ∆M_SDR between these lines gives a contrast, over which signals can be coherently modulated by a suitable Selective Dynamical Decoupling (SDR) filter function.
Time evolution of the spin magnetization under CPMG (N = 8 pulses) and Hahn-echo sequences for spins diffusing in a restricted space (circles, triangles), and under free diffusion (crosses, dashes). The solid black lines show the time range where the restricted diffusion effects dominate; the difference ∆M_SDR between these lines gives a contrast, over which signals can be coherently modulated by a suitable Selective Dynamical Decoupling (SDR) filter function.
Experimental SDR signals normalized with the first data point (symbols) as a function of the x delays of the SDR sequence. The solid lines are analytical fittings of our model to the experimental curve. By using the measured diffusion coefficient D0 ∼ 2.3 × 10−5 cm^2/s, the fitted diameter d given in the plots is in agreement with the nominal value d = 5 ± 1μm.
Experimental SDR signals normalized with the first data point (symbols) as a function of the x delays of the SDR sequence. The solid lines are analytical fittings of our model to the experimental curve. By using the measured diffusion coefficient D0 ∼ 2.3 × 10−5 cm^2/s, the fitted diameter d given in the plots is in agreement with the nominal value d = 5 ± 1μm. The behavior of the SDR curves resemble the root mean square displacement of the diffusing spins in a restricted space: in both cases curves plateu for times x larger than the correlation time characteristic of achieving a restricted diffusion regime, evidence a full sampling of the restricting space.
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Random – but not quite: exploiting quantum decoherence as a tool for characterizing unknown systems | Seminar

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SEMINAR at IV Quantum Information Workshop – Paraty 2013

Wednesday, August 14th 2013

See comments of the talk at the Paraty 2013’s Blog: Decoupling system and environment.

SEMINAR at CBPF, Rio de Janeiro – Brazil, August 20th, 2013

SEMINAR at FaMAF, Córdoba – Argentina, August 27th, 2013

Abstract

The ability to understand and manipulate the dynamics of quantum systems that interact with external degrees of freedom is a major challenge for fundamental quantum physics and its diverse applications, e.g., quantum information processing (QIP) or precision measurements. Progress in dynamical decoupling has lead to new ways to “protect” quantum bits from external degrees of freedom. Sometimes, however, a little bit of “recoupling” –i.e., exposure to the unknowns of the surrounding medium– can help. In this seminar, I will present a series of experimental methods implemented in NMR where by varying the “protection” given to the quantum states of ½-spins (qubits) can lead to new tools for characterizing unknown systems. In particular, I will show how Dynamical Decoupling noise spectroscopy can probe the spectrum of the environmental noise in order to find optimal methods for protecting the qubits [1]. In a new twist, I will present a method termed Selective Dynamical Recoupling (SDR), where suitable designed pulse sequence applied to the spins can selectively address specific information from the probed systems. SDR can be used to measure coupling strengths to the environment via oscillatory modulations that can serve for example to probe chemical identities derived from chemical shifts [2]. Alternatively, SDR can be designed to selectively measure the correlation time of the environmental noise where its value can be useful to probe diffusion processes in restricted spaces to extract the sizes of pores or cells in a non-invasive manner [3]. Applications of this new and simple approach can be found in materials sciences and biology and in particular it can be useful for investigating the nature of tissue compartmentalization in vivo, in manners which eventually could be useful in human and clinical settings.

[1] G.A. Alvarez, and D. Suter. Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 230501 (2011).

[2] P.E.S. Smith, G. Bensky, G.A. Alvarez, G. Kurizki, and L. Frydman. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109, 5958 (2012).

[3] G.A. Alvarez, N. Shemesh, and L. Frydman. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 080404 (2013).

Compartment size map of a ex-vivo mouse brain masked for the corpus callosum
Compartment size map of a ex-vivo mouse brain masked for the corpus callosum. The compartment sizes were measured by implementing Selective Dynamical Recoupling pulse sequences to spin-1/2 carrying molecules for selectively addressing the correlation time of their diffusion process.

Random – but not quite: exploiting quantum decoherence as a tool for characterizing unknown systems | Paraty 2013

Posted on Updated on

SEMINAR at IV Quantum Information Workshop – Paraty 2013

Wednesday, August 14th 2013

See comments of the talk at the Paraty 2013’s Blog: Decoupling system and environment.

Abstract

The ability to understand and manipulate the dynamics of quantum systems that interact with external degrees of freedom is a major challenge for fundamental quantum physics and its diverse applications, e.g., quantum information processing (QIP) or precision measurements. Progress in dynamical decoupling has lead to new ways to “protect” quantum bits from external degrees of freedom. Sometimes, however, a little bit of “recoupling” –i.e., exposure to the unknowns of the surrounding medium– can help. In this seminar, I will present a series of experimental methods implemented in NMR where by varying the “protection” given to the quantum states of ½-spins (qubits) can lead to new tools for characterizing unknown systems. In particular, I will show how Dynamical Decoupling noise spectroscopy can probe the spectrum of the environmental noise in order to find optimal methods for protecting the qubits [1]. In a new twist, I will present a method termed Selective Dynamical Recoupling (SDR), where suitable designed pulse sequence applied to the spins can selectively address specific information from the probed systems. SDR can be used to measure coupling strengths to the environment via oscillatory modulations that can serve for example to probe chemical identities derived from chemical shifts [2]. Alternatively, SDR can be designed to selectively measure the correlation time of the environmental noise where its value can be useful to probe diffusion processes in restricted spaces to extract the sizes of pores or cells in a non-invasive manner [3]. Applications of this new and simple approach can be found in materials sciences and biology and in particular it can be useful for investigating the nature of tissue compartmentalization in vivo, in manners which eventually could be useful in human and clinical settings.

[1] G.A. Alvarez, and D. Suter. Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 230501 (2011).

[2] P.E.S. Smith, G. Bensky, G.A. Alvarez, G. Kurizki, and L. Frydman. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109, 5958 (2012).

[3] G.A. Alvarez, N. Shemesh, and L. Frydman. Phys. Rev. Lett. (2013) – in press. arXiv:1305.2794.