quantum state

Quantum state transfer in disordered spin chains: How much engineering is reasonable? | Quant. Inf. Comm. (2015)

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Analia Zwick, Gonzalo A. Álvarez, Joachim Stolze, and Omar Osenda

Quant. Inf. Comput. 15, 582-600 (2015).

The transmission of quantum states through spin chains is an important element in the im- plementation of quantum information technologies. Speed and fidelity of transfer are the main objectives which have to be achieved by the devices even in the presence of imperfections which are unavoidable in any manufacturing process. To reach these goals, several kinds of spin chains have been suggested, which differ in the degree of fine-tuning, or engineering, of the system parameters. In this work we present a systematic study of two important classes of such chains. In one class only the spin couplings at the ends of the chain have to be adjusted to a value different from the bulk coupling constant, while in the other class every coupling has to have a specific value. We demonstrate that configurations from the two different classes may perform similarly when subjected to the same kind of disorder in spite of the large difference in the engineering effort necessary to prepare the system. We identify the system features responsible for these similarities and we perform a detailed study of the transfer fidelity as a function of chain length and disorder strength, yielding empirical scaling laws for the fidelity which are similar for all kinds of chain and all dis- order models. These results are helpful in identifying the optimal spin chain for a given quantum information transfer task. In particular, they help in judging whether it is worthwhile to engineer all couplings in the chain as compared to adjusting only the boundary couplings.

via [1306.1695] Quantum state transfer in disordered spin chains: How much engineering is reasonable?.

Comparison of the averaged state transfer fidelity for different quantum state transfer channels. The left hand side panels are boundary controlled spin-chain channels and the right hand side panels are fully engineered perfect state transfer channels. Two kinds of disorder are considered in the plot: Absolute disorder with a perturbation strength proportional to the maximum coupling strength of the spin-chain or relative disorder when the perturbation strength in each spin-spin coupling is relative to its optimal value. For the boundary controlled spin channels, both types of disorder are equivalent since the bulk of the chains contains homogeneous couplings, while for the fully engineered spin-channels they provide different effects on the transfer fidelity. The average is calculated over 1000 disorder realizations. The black contour lines belong to fidelities F = 0.99, 0.95, 0.9, 0.8, 0.7, respectively. The colored symbols show the crossovers between the different systems.
Comparison of the averaged state transfer fidelity for different quantum state transfer channels. The left hand side panels are boundary controlled spin-chain channels and the right hand side panels are fully engineered perfect state transfer channels. Two kinds of disorder are considered in the plot: Absolute disorder with a perturbation strength proportional to the maximum coupling strength of the spin-chain or relative disorder when the perturbation strength in each spin-spin coupling is relative to its optimal value. For the boundary controlled spin channels, both types of disorder are equivalent since the bulk of the chains contains homogeneous couplings, while for the fully engineered spin-channels they provide different effects on the transfer fidelity. The average is calculated over 1000 disorder realizations. The black contour lines belong to fidelities F = 0.99, 0.95, 0.9, 0.8, 0.7, respectively. The colored symbols show the crossovers between the different systems.
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Diffusion-assisted selective dynamical recoupling: A new approach to measure background gradients in magnetic resonance | J. Chem. Phys. (2014)

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Diffusion-assisted selective dynamical recoupling: A new approach to measure background gradients in magnetic resonance

Gonzalo A. Álvarez, Noam Shemesh and Lucio Frydman
J. Chem. Phys. 140, 084205 (2014); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4865335

Dynamical decoupling, a generalization of the original NMR spin-echo sequence, is becoming increasingly relevant as a tool for reducing decoherence in quantum systems. Such sequences apply non-equidistant refocusing pulses for optimizing the coupling between systems, and environmental fluctuations characterized by a given noise spectrum. One such sequence, dubbed Selective Dynamical Recoupling SDR [P. E. S. Smith, G. Bensky, G. A. Álvarez, G. Kurizki, and L. Frydman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 109, 5958 (2012)], allows one to coherently reintroduce diffusion decoherence effects driven by fluctuations arising from restricted molecular diffusion [G. A. Álvarez, N. Shemesh, and L. Frydman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 080404 (2013)]. The fully-refocused, constant-time, and constant-number-of-pulses nature of SDR also allows one to filter out “intrinsic” T1 and T2 weightings, as well as pulse errors acting as additional sources of decoherence. This article explores such features when the fluctuations are now driven by unrestricted molecular diffusion. In particular, we show that diffusion-driven SDR can be exploited to investigate the decoherence arising from the frequency fluctuations imposed by internal gradients. As a result, SDR presents a unique way of probing and characterizing these internal magnetic fields, given an a priori known free diffusion coefficient. This has important implications in studies of structured systems, including porous media and live tissues, where the internal gradients may serve as fingerprints for the systems composition or structure. The principles of this method, along with full analytical solutions for the unrestricted diffusion-driven modulation of the SDR signal, are presented. The potential of this approach is demonstrated with the generation of a novel source of MRI contrast, based on the background gradients active in an ex vivo mouse brain. Additional features and limitations of this new method are discussed.

© 2014 AIP Publishing LLC

via Diffusion-assisted selective dynamical recoupling: A new approach to measure background gradients in magnetic resonance, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 084205 (2014); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4865335.

Selective dynamical recoupling (SDR) series of images and the corresponding ex-vivo mouse brain background gradients (central panel) derived from these data.
Selective dynamical recoupling (SDR) series of images and the corresponding ex-vivo mouse brain background gradients (central panel) derived from these data.

Quantum simulations of localization effects with dipolar interactions | Annalen der Physik – 2013

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Quantum simulations of localization effects with dipolar interactions

Gonzalo A. Álvarez, Robin Kaiser, Dieter Suter

Abstract:
Quantum information processing often uses systems with dipolar interactions. Here a nuclear spin-based quantum simulator is used to study the spreading of information in such a dipolar-coupled system. While the information spreads with no apparent limits in the case of ideal dipolar couplings, additional perturbations limit the spreading, leading to localization. In previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 230403 (2010)], it was found that the system size reaches a dynamic equilibrium that decreases with the square of the perturbation strength. This work examines the impact of a disordered Hamiltonian with dipolar interactions. It shows that the expansion of the cluster of spins freezes in the presence of large disorder, reminiscent of Anderson localization of non-interacting waves in a disordered potential.

Keywords: spin dynamics;dipolar interaction;decoherence;localization;disorder;NMR;long range interactions;quantum information processing

Annalen der Physik
Special Issue on “Quantum Simulations“, featuring review papers written by last year’s Nobel Prize winners describing their foundational work (Wineland and Haroche). Issue edited by: Rainer Blatt, Immanuel Bloch, Ignacio Cirac, Peter Zoller.
Ann. Phys. 525, 833 (2013).
DOI: 10.1002/andp.201300096

© 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

via Quantum simulations of localization effects with dipolar interactions – Álvarez – 2013 – Annalen der Physik – Wiley Online Library.

Quantum simulations of localization effects with dipolar interactions - Álvarez - 2013 - Annalen der Physik - Wiley Online Library
Time evolution of the cluster-size of correlated spins starting from different initial sates. The experimental data is shown for two different perturbation strengths given in the legend. The solid black squares, red triangles and green rhombuses are evolutions from an uncorrelated initial state. Empty symbols start from an initial state with K0 correlated spins. The insets show the Multiple Quantum Coherence spectrum starting from K0 = 141 as a functions of time for a perturbation strength.

Robustness of Spin-Chain State-Transfer Schemes – Springer

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Robustness of Spin-Chain State-Transfer Schemes

Joachim Stolze, Gonzalo A. Álvarez, Omar Osenda, Analia Zwick

in Quantum State Transfer and Network Engineering, edited by G. M. Nikolopoulos and I. Jex (Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2014), pp. 149–182.

Abstract

Spin chains are linear arrangements of qubits (spin-1/2 objects) with interactions between nearest or more distant neighbors. They have been considered for quantum information transfer between subunits of a quantum information processing device at short or intermediate distances. The most frequently studied task is the transfer of a single-qubit state. Several protocols have been developed to achieve this goal, broadly divisible into two classes, fully-engineered and boundary-controlled spin chains. We discuss state transfer induced by the natural dynamics of these two classes of systems, and the influence of deviations from the ideal system configuration, that is, manufacturing errors in the nearest-neighbor spin couplings. The fidelity of state transfer depends on the chain length and the disorder strength. We observe a power-law scaling of the fidelity deficit, i.e. the deviation from perfect transfer. Boundary-controlled chains can provide excellent fidelity under suitable circumstances and are potentially less difficult to manufacture and control than fully-engineered chains. We also review other existing theoretical work on the robustness of quantum state transfer as well as proposals for experimental implementation.

via Robustness of Spin-Chain State-Transfer Schemes – Springer.

Robustness of spin-chain state-transfer schemes

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Joachim Stolze, Gonzalo A. Álvarez, Omar Osenda, and Analia Zwick
To appear in Georgios M. Nikolopoulos and Igor Jex, editors:
Quantum State Transfer and Quantum Network Engineering. Springer Series in Quantum Science and Technology, Springer, Berlin 2013.

Spin chains are linear arrangements of qubits (spin-1/2 objects) with interactions between nearest or more distant neighbors. They have been considered for quantum information transfer between subunits of a quantum information processing device at short or intermediate distances. The most frequently studied task is the transfer of a single-qubit state. Several protocols have been developed to achieve this goal, broadly divisible into two classes, fully-engineered and boundary- controlled spin chains. We discuss state transfer induced by the natural dynamics of these two classes of systems, and the influence of deviations from the ideal system configuration, that is, manufacturing errors in the nearest-neighbor spin couplings. The fidelity of state transfer depends on the chain length and the disorder strength. We observe a power-law scaling of the fidelity deficit, i.e. the deviation from perfect transfer. Boundary-controlled chains can provide excellent fidelity under suitable circumstances and are potentially less difficult to manufacture and control than fully-engineered chains. We also review other existing theoretical work on the robustness of quantum state transfer as well as proposals for experimental implementation.

Effects of time-reversal symmetry in dynamical decoupling | Phys. Rev. A 85, 032306 2012

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Alexandre M. Souza, Gonzalo A. Álvarez, and Dieter Suter

Fakultät Physik, Technische Universität Dortmund, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany

Received 15 December 2011; published 7 March 2012

Dynamical decoupling is a technique for preserving the coherence of quantum-mechanical states in the presence of a noisy environment. It uses sequences of inversion pulses to suppress the environmental perturbations by periodically refocusing them. It has been shown that different sequences of inversion pulses show vastly different performance, in particular also concerning the correction of experimental pulse imperfections. Here, we investigate specifically the role of time-reversal symmetry in the building blocks of the pulse sequence. We show that using time-symmetric building blocks often improves the performance of the sequence compared to sequences formed by time-asymmetric building blocks. Using quantum state tomography of the echoes generated by the sequences, we analyze the mechanisms that lead to loss of fidelity and show how they can be compensated by suitable concatenation of symmetry-related blocks of decoupling pulses.©2012 American Physical Society

via Phys. Rev. A 85, 032306 2012: Effects of time-reversal symmetry in dynamical decoupling.

Evolution of the magnetization during the symmetric (S) and asymmetric (A) versions of the XY-16 sequence for pulse spacings of τ = 10μs. The panels represents the Bloch vector in the xy plane at different times. The color code in the lower panel denotes the time evolution, blue for the initial state and red for the final state.
Evolution of the magnetization during the symmetric (S) and asymmetric (A) versions of the XY-16 sequence for pulse spacings of τ = 10μs. The panels represents the Bloch vector in the xy plane at different times. The color code in the lower panel denotes the time evolution, blue for the initial state and red for the final state.