Nat. Commun.: Local and bulk 13C hyperpolarization in nitrogen-vacancy-centred diamonds at variable fields and orientations

Gonzalo A. Álvarez, Christian O. Bretschneider, Ran Fischer, Paz London, Hisao Kanda, Shinobu Onoda, Junichi Isoya, David Gershoni & Lucio Frydman

Nature Communications 6, 8456 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncomms9456

 

 
Combined Optical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) setup for hyperpolarizing nuclear spins in diamonds at room- temperature. During the polarization transfer phase, the entire single-crystal diamond (red in the picture) is irradiated with green laser light and microwaves underneath the NMR magnet at a low magnetic field. The hyperpolarized diamond is then shuttled into a high field superconducting magnet, for a directly detected NMR experiment on the 13C spins.Polarizing nuclear spins is of fundamental importance in biology, chemistry and physics. Methods for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei from free electrons in bulk usually demand operation at cryogenic temperatures. Room temperature approaches targeting diamonds with nitrogen-vacancy centres could alleviate this need; however, hitherto proposed strategies lack generality as they demand stringent conditions on the strength and/or alignment of the magnetic field. We report here an approach for achieving efficient electron-13C spin-alignment transfers, compatible with a broad range of magnetic field strengths and field orientations with respect to the diamond crystal. This versatility results from combining coherent microwave- and incoherent laser-induced transitions between selected energy states of the coupled electron–nuclear spin manifold. 13C-detected nuclear magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that this hyperpolarization can be transferred via first-shell or via distant 13Cs throughout the nuclear bulk ensemble. This method opens new perspectives for applications of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres in nuclear magnetic resonance, and in quantum information processing.

 

Source: Local and bulk 13C hyperpolarization in nitrogen-vacancy-centred diamonds at variable fields and orientations : Nature Communications : Nature Publishing Group

 

Acquiring ensemble 13C polarization spectra for varying NV orientations with respect to B0. (a) Opto-NMR set-up and (b) detection sequence used in these experiments. During the polarization transfer phase, the entire single-crystal diamond is irradiated with laser light and MW underneath the NMR magnet at a low B0. The hyperpolarized diamond is then shuttled (in <1 s) into a 4.7-T superconducting magnet to directly detect its macroscopic 13C magnetization via a spin-echo sequence. The low B0 magnetic field is aligned to one of the nitrogen-vacancy-centre orientations (in red), while the other three orientations (in blue) subtend an angle of ≈109° with respect to the field. (c) Typical 13C polarization enhancement patterns observed by NMR as a function of the MW frequency ω with signals normalized with respect to the thermal 13C response at 4.7 T (inset). The left part of the plot corresponds the nuclear polarization generated by MW transitions for the aligned orientation (red circles), while the right part corresponds to nuclear polarization enhanced via the three non-aligned, equivalent orientations (blue circles). The ≈1:3 intensity ratio reflects the relative abundances of aligned and non-aligned sites in the diamond’s tetrahedral structure. In each of the patterns, the central peaks represent bulk nuclear hyperpolarization pumped via 13C spins coupled with hyperfine interactions lower than 20 MHz, while the outer peaks originate from first-shell 13Cs whose hyperfine splitting is ≈130 MHz (refs 26, 29). The antiphase structure of each of these peaks corresponds to the MW transitions and at one side of the central peaks, and to the state at the other side. The inset shows NMR spectra obtained for a thermally polarized sample, and at the maxima of the central peaks for the aligned and non-aligned orientations. p.p.m. refers to parts-per-million of the high-field NMR 13C resonance frequency, which in our case is 50.5 MHz.

Acquiring ensemble 13C polarization spectra for varying NV orientations with respect to B0. (a) Opto-NMR set-up and (b) detection sequence used in these experiments. During the polarization transfer phase, the entire single-crystal diamond is irradiated with laser light and MW underneath the NMR magnet at a low B0. The hyperpolarized diamond is then shuttled (in <1 s) into a 4.7-T superconducting magnet to directly detect its macroscopic 13C magnetization via a spin-echo sequence. The low B0 magnetic field is aligned to one of the nitrogen-vacancy-centre orientations (in red), while the other three orientations (in blue) subtend an angle of ≈109° with respect to the field. (c) Typical 13C polarization enhancement patterns observed by NMR as a function of the MW frequency ω with signals normalized with respect to the thermal 13C response at 4.7 T (inset). The left part of the plot corresponds the nuclear polarization generated by MW transitions for the aligned orientation (red circles), while the right part corresponds to nuclear polarization enhanced via the three non-aligned, equivalent orientations (blue circles). The ≈1:3 intensity ratio reflects the relative abundances of aligned and non-aligned sites in the diamond’s tetrahedral structure. In each of the patterns, the central peaks represent bulk nuclear hyperpolarization pumped via 13C spins coupled with hyperfine interactions lower than 20 MHz, while the outer peaks originate from first-shell 13Cs whose hyperfine splitting is ≈130 MHz. The inset shows NMR spectra obtained for a thermally polarized sample, and at the maxima of the central peaks for the aligned and non-aligned orientations. p.p.m. refers to parts-per-million of the high-field NMR 13C resonance frequency, which in our case is 50.5 MHz.

Quanten-Computer löst Quanten-Problem :: pro-physik.de

Quanten-Computer löst Quanten-Problem

Einfluss von Störungen auf das Ausbreiten eines Quantensystems untersucht.

Source: :: Quanten-Computer löst Quanten-Problem :: pro-physik.de

Physiker lösen Problem mit Hilfe von Quanten-Computer der TU Dortmund

See the article about our work “Localization-delocalization transition in the dynamics of dipolar-coupled nuclear spins” in the idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft online magazine: Physiker lösen Problem mit Hilfe von Quanten-Computer der TU Dortmund

Physiker lösen Problem mit Hilfe von Quanten-Computer der TU Dortmund

See the article about our work “Localization-delocalization transition in the dynamics of dipolar-coupled nuclear spins” in the Innovation Report magazine: Physiker lösen Problem mit Hilfe von Quanten-Computer der TU Dortmund

Science: Localization-delocalization transition in the dynamics of dipolar-coupled nuclear spins

Nonequilibrium dynamics of many-body systems are important in many scientific fields. Here, we report the experimental observation of a phase transition of the quantum coherent dynamics of a three-dimensional many-spin system with dipolar interactions. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on a solid-state system of spins at room-temperature, we quench the interaction Hamiltonian to drive the evolution of the system. Depending on the quench strength, we then observe either localized or extended dynamics of the system coherence. We extract the critical exponents for the localized cluster size of correlated spins and diffusion coefficient around the phase transition separating the localized from the delocalized dynamical regime. These results show that NMR techniques are well suited to studying the nonequilibrium dynamics of complex many-body systems.

 

Gonzalo A. Álvarez (1), Dieter Suter (2), Robin Kaiser (3)

(1) Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100, Rehovot, Israel.
(2) Fakultät Physik, Technische Universität Dortmund, D-44221, Dortmund, Germany.
(3) Institut Non-Linéaire de Nice, CNRS, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, 06560, Valbonne, France.

Science 349, 846 (2015)

DOI: 10.1126/science.1261160

 

scaling_localization-delocalization_transition

Time evolution of the cluster size of correlated spins K for different quench strengths (1-p) and finite-time scaling procedure. (A) Cluster-size K as a function of the time t after the quench. The unperturbed quenched evolution (black squares) shows a cluster-size K that grows as ∼t^(4.3) at long times (dashed line is a guide to the eye). The solid symbols show the points used for a finite-time scaling analysis, while the empty symbols do not belong to the long time regime (t < 0.3 ms). For the largest perturbation strengths p to the quench, localization effects are clearly visible by the saturation of the cluster size. (B and C) In these two panels, we present the finite-time scaling procedure. In (B), the rescaled and squared correlation length l^2= K^(2/3) as a function of the evolution time 1=t^(k_2) is plotted. In (C), the curves of (B) are rescaled horizontally by the scaling factor ξ(p) to obtain a universal scaling law.

 

localization-delocalization_transition

Scaling factor and critical exponents. Normalized scaling factor ξ(p) as a function of p (blue triangles). The red solid line is a fit to the blue triangles with a expression ξ(p) proportional to|p − p_c|^nu, the critical exponent is then nu= 0,42. The two insets show the distribution of coherence orders of the density matrix as a function of the evolution time t for two perturbation strengths, which correspond to a delocalized and localized regime, respectively. The corresponding scaling factors are indicated by the arrows.

via Localization-delocalization transition in the dynamics of dipolar-coupled nuclear spins.

PLoS ONE: Size Distribution Imaging by Non-Uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin Echo (NOGSE) MRI

Noam Shemesh, Gonzalo A. Álvarez, Lucio Frydman

Published: July 21, 2015

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0133201

Abstract

Objects making up complex porous systems in Nature usually span a range of sizes. These size distributions play fundamental roles in defining the physicochemical, biophysical and physiological properties of a wide variety of systems – ranging from advanced catalytic materials to Central Nervous System diseases. Accurate and noninvasive measurements of size distributions in opaque, three-dimensional objects, have thus remained long-standing and important challenges. Herein we describe how a recently introduced diffusion-based magnetic resonance methodology, Non-Uniform-Oscillating-Gradient-Spin-Ec​ho(NOGSE), can determine such distributions noninvasively. The method relies on its ability to probe confining lengths with a (length)^6 parametric sensitivity, in a constant-time, constant-number-of-gradients fashion; combined, these attributes provide sufficient sensitivity for characterizing the underlying distributions in μm-scaled cellular systems. Theoretical derivations and simulations are presented to verify NOGSE’s ability to faithfully reconstruct size distributions through suitable modeling of their distribution parameters. Experiments in yeast cell suspensions – where the ground truth can be determined from ancillary microscopy – corroborate these trends experimentally. Finally, by appending to the NOGSE protocol an imaging acquisition, novel MRI maps of cellular size distributions were collected from a mouse brain. The ensuing micro-architectural contrasts successfully delineated distinctive hallmark anatomical sub-structures, in both white matter and gray matter tissues, in a non-invasive manner. Such findings highlight NOGSE’s potential for characterizing aberrations in cellular size distributions upon disease, or during normal processes such as development.

Citation: Shemesh N, Álvarez GA, Frydman L (2015) Size Distribution Imaging by Non-Uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin Echo (NOGSE) MRI. PLoS ONE 10(7): e0133201. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0133201

Editor: Ichio Aoki, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, JAPAN

Received: November 25, 2014; Accepted: June 24, 2015; Published: July 21, 2015

Copyright: © 2015 Shemesh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited

 

via PLOS ONE: Size Distribution Imaging by Non-Uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin Echo (NOGSE) MRI.

 

Magnetic resonance virtual histology

Magnetic resonance virtual histology based on probing molecular diffusion in tissues. Non-uniform oscillating gradient spin-echo (NOGSE) sequences are applied to generate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. The compartment size distributions in a mouse corpus callosum are extracted highlighting the different anatomical regions.

Quantum state transfer in disordered spin chains: How much engineering is reasonable? | Quant. Inf. Comm. (2015)

Analia Zwick, Gonzalo A. Álvarez, Joachim Stolze, and Omar Osenda

Quant. Inf. Comput. 15, 582-600 (2015).

The transmission of quantum states through spin chains is an important element in the im- plementation of quantum information technologies. Speed and fidelity of transfer are the main objectives which have to be achieved by the devices even in the presence of imperfections which are unavoidable in any manufacturing process. To reach these goals, several kinds of spin chains have been suggested, which differ in the degree of fine-tuning, or engineering, of the system parameters. In this work we present a systematic study of two important classes of such chains. In one class only the spin couplings at the ends of the chain have to be adjusted to a value different from the bulk coupling constant, while in the other class every coupling has to have a specific value. We demonstrate that configurations from the two different classes may perform similarly when subjected to the same kind of disorder in spite of the large difference in the engineering effort necessary to prepare the system. We identify the system features responsible for these similarities and we perform a detailed study of the transfer fidelity as a function of chain length and disorder strength, yielding empirical scaling laws for the fidelity which are similar for all kinds of chain and all dis- order models. These results are helpful in identifying the optimal spin chain for a given quantum information transfer task. In particular, they help in judging whether it is worthwhile to engineer all couplings in the chain as compared to adjusting only the boundary couplings.

via [1306.1695] Quantum state transfer in disordered spin chains: How much engineering is reasonable?.

Comparison of the averaged state transfer fidelity for different quantum state transfer channels. The left hand side panels are boundary controlled spin-chain channels and the right hand side panels are fully engineered perfect state transfer channels. Two kinds of disorder are considered in the plot: Absolute disorder with a perturbation strength proportional to the maximum coupling strength of the spin-chain or relative disorder when the perturbation strength in each spin-spin coupling is relative to its optimal value. For the boundary controlled spin channels, both types of disorder are equivalent since the bulk of the chains contains homogeneous couplings, while for the fully engineered spin-channels they provide different effects on the transfer fidelity. The average is calculated over 1000 disorder realizations. The black contour lines belong to fidelities F = 0.99, 0.95, 0.9, 0.8, 0.7, respectively. The colored symbols show the crossovers between the different systems.

Comparison of the averaged state transfer fidelity for different quantum state transfer channels. The left hand side panels are boundary controlled spin-chain channels and the right hand side panels are fully engineered perfect state transfer channels. Two kinds of disorder are considered in the plot: Absolute disorder with a perturbation strength proportional to the maximum coupling strength of the spin-chain or relative disorder when the perturbation strength in each spin-spin coupling is relative to its optimal value. For the boundary controlled spin channels, both types of disorder are equivalent since the bulk of the chains contains homogeneous couplings, while for the fully engineered spin-channels they provide different effects on the transfer fidelity. The average is calculated over 1000 disorder realizations. The black contour lines belong to fidelities F = 0.99, 0.95, 0.9, 0.8, 0.7, respectively. The colored symbols show the crossovers between the different systems.

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